prevent “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”

The Paris agreement is unequivocal in its call for a paradigm shift in society, establishing as a global ambition the total decarbonization of society by the end of the century.

CARBON NEUTRALITY AND DECARBONIZATION

Paris Agreement

The history of climate change science has evolved around the concept of a level of climate change considered as an acceptable risk to human society and the ecosystems that support it. Since 1992, the formal objective of the Framework Convention on Climate Change is to prevent “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”.

In Paris in 2015, countries quantified this objective and made it official: the goal of preventing an increase in global average temperature of more than 2ºC above pre-industrial levels and make efforts to prevent an increase of more than 1,5°C was established. In turn, this climate objective can only be reached with reasonable probability (> 50%) if net global emissions reach zero by the end of this century.  Thus appears the concept of carbon neutrality, which is no more than a corollary of the commitment already made by nations in previous climate summits.

Paradigm Shift

Carbon neutrality means zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (i.e. emissions minus removals) of the national total emissions from a national inventory submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The Paris agreement is unequivocal in its call for a paradigm shift in society, establishing as a global ambition the total decarbonization of society by the end of the century. This need for decarbonization is supported by the scenarios produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).